Performance management and well-being: a close look at the changing nature of the UK higher education workplace

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dc.contributor.author Franco-Santos, Monica
dc.contributor.author Doherty, Noeleen
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-14T12:55:52Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-14T12:55:52Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06
dc.identifier.citation Monica Franco-Santos and Noeleen Doherty. Performance management and well-being: a close look at the changing nature of the UK higher education workplace. International Journal of Human Resource Management, Volume 28, Issue 16, 2017, pp. 2319-2350 en_UK
dc.identifier.issn 0958-5192
dc.identifier.uri httpa;//dx.doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2017.1334148
dc.identifier.uri http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/12022
dc.description.abstract The relationship between HRM and well-being has received a significant amount of research attention; however, results are still contested. Our study addresses this phenomenon in the Higher Education sector. We specifically investigate the association between performance management and the perceived well-being of academic staff. Our research finds that the application of a directive performance management approach, underpinned by agency theory ideas as evidenced by a high reliance on performance measures and targets, is negatively related to academics’ well-being (i.e. the more it is used, the worse people feel). In contrast, an enabling performance management approach, based on the learnings of stewardship theory, emphasising staff involvement, communication and development, is positively related to academics’ well-being. We also find the positive relationship between enabling practices and well-being is mediated by how academics experience their work (i.e. their perceptions of job demands, job control and management support). These results indicate that current trends to intensify the use of directive performance management can have consequences on the energy and health of academics, which may influence their motivation and willingness to stay in the profession. This research suggests that an enabling approach to managing performance in this context, may have more positive effects. en_UK
dc.language.iso en en_UK
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en_UK
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject Performance management en_UK
dc.subject well-being en_UK
dc.subject academia en_UK
dc.subject HRM en_UK
dc.subject employee work experiences en_UK
dc.subject PLS-SEM en_UK
dc.title Performance management and well-being: a close look at the changing nature of the UK higher education workplace en_UK
dc.type Article en_UK


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