CERES > School of Applied Sciences (SAS) (2006-July 2014) > Staff publications - School of Applied Sciences >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/8553

Document Type: Conference paper
Title: Progress towards a best practice method for modelling dispersion of bioaerosols from composting facilities
Authors: Drew, Gillian H.
Tamer Vestlund, Asli
Jordinson, G.
Taha, M. P. M.
Smith, Richard
Tyrrel, Sean F.
Longhurst, Philip J.
Pollard, Simon J. T.
Issue Date: 2007
Citation: G.H. Drew, A. Tamer Vestlund, G. Jordinson, M.P.M. Taha R. Smith, S. Tyrrel, P.J. Longhurst and S.J.T. Pollard. Progress towards a best practice method for modelling dispersion of bioaerosols from composting facilities. Proceedings Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy. 1-5 October 2007.
Abstract: The promotion of composting in the UK as a sustainable waste management option has led to concerns regarding exposure of the public to potentially harmful emissions of airborne micro-organisms or bioaerosols. In response to public concerns, the Environment Agency in England and Wales requires a risk assessment for any licensed composting facility that has a sensitive receptor within 250m of the site boundary. An ongoing programme of studies in association with the Environment Agency has begun to explore methods to improve exposure assessments for bioaerosols. Our results have shown that is is possible to use air dispersion models for estimating downwind concentrations of bioaerosols, and the more advanced modelling options, such as the use of intermittent emission rates, result in lower downwind concentrations. Current risk assessments may be over-estimating the exposure of receptors to bioaerosols from composting, however further studies are needed to validate the results presented here. 1. INTRODUCTION The promotion of composting in the UK as a more sustainable waste management option has led to concerns regarding exposure of the public to potentially harmful emissions of airborne microorganisms or bioaerosols. The composting process is reliant on various micro-organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, to break down the organic matter. However, if as a result of composting operations these micro-organisms become airborne, may be breathed in, and due to their small size, can penetrate deep into the human respiratory system. Conditions such as farmer's lung disease and aspergillosis (Latgé, 1999) have been linked to high concentrations of bioaerosols, although dose-response relationships are not well defined. In response to public concerns, the Environment Agency in England and Wales requires a risk assessment for any licensed composting facility that has a sensitive receptor within 250m of the
URI: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/8553
Appears in Collections:Staff publications - School of Applied Sciences

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Best_practice-Dispersion_of_bioaerosols_from_composting_facilities-2007.pdf194.8 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

SFX Query

Items in CERES are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.