Positioning in political marketing: How Semiotic Analysis Can Support Traditional Survey Approaches

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dc.contributor.author Baines, Paul R. -
dc.contributor.author Crawford, Ian -
dc.contributor.author O'Shaughnessy, N. J. -
dc.contributor.author Worcester, R. -
dc.contributor.author Mortimore, R. -
dc.date.accessioned 2014-03-18T04:02:41Z
dc.date.available 2014-03-18T04:02:41Z
dc.date.issued 2014-01-01T00:00:00Z -
dc.identifier.issn 0267-257X -
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0267257X.2013.810166 -
dc.identifier.uri http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/8335
dc.description.abstract The 2010 British election particularly focused on the party leaders' images - a departure in fifty years of British elections. The principal contribution of the article is to illustrate how a combined approach to assessing leadership positioning using both the traditional survey and semiotic analysis can provide insights into what image attribute dimensions end up in the minds of members of the public (actual positioning) and on what image attribute dimensions party marketers are trying to position themselves (intended positioning). Using data from the 2010 British general elections, our findings indicate that the combined methodological approach would be particularly useful for brands that need repositioning, those whose image attribute positions change dramatically over time, and those who wish to target previously unresponsive target audience segments. en_UK
dc.language.iso en_UK -
dc.publisher Westburn Publishers en_UK
dc.title Positioning in political marketing: How Semiotic Analysis Can Support Traditional Survey Approaches en_UK
dc.type Article -


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