Fungal community assemblages in a high elevation desert environment: absence of dispersal limitation and edaphic effects in surface soil

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dc.contributor.author Yang, Teng
dc.contributor.author Adams, Jonathan M.
dc.contributor.author Shi, Yu
dc.contributor.author Sun, Huaibo
dc.contributor.author Cheng, Liang
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Yangjian
dc.contributor.author Chu, Haiyan
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-15T09:23:12Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-15T09:23:12Z
dc.date.issued 2017-10-05
dc.identifier.citation Yang, T., Adams JM., Shi, Y., Sun H., Cheng, L., Zhang, Y., and Chu, H. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, December 2017, Volume 115, Pages 393-402.
dc.identifier.issn 0038-0717
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2017.09.013
dc.identifier.uri http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/12759
dc.description.abstract Recent studies have shown the significant effects of environmental selection and possible dispersal limitation on soil fungal communities. However, less is known about the role of soil depth in fungal community assemblages, especially under soil environments that are intensely cold, infertile and water-deficient. In Ngari drylands of the Asiatic Plateau, we studied fungal assemblages at two soil depths, using Illumina sequencing of the ITS2 region for fungal identification (0–15 cm as the surface soil and 15–30 cm as the subsurface soil). Fungal diversity in the surface soil was much higher than that in the subsurface soil (P < 0.001), and communities differed significantly between the two layers (P = 0.001). Neither soil properties nor dispersal limitation could explain variation in the surface-soil fungal community. For the subsurface, by contrast, soil, climate and space explained 27% of variation in fungal community. Collectively, these results point to high dispersal rates and absence of edaphic effects in the surface-soil fungal community assemblage in Ngari drylands. It also suggests that for soil fungi with highly effective dispersal, regional distributions may fit with Bass-Becking's paradigm that ‘Everything is everywhere’. en_UK
dc.language.iso en en_UK
dc.publisher Elsevier en_UK
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ *
dc.subject Fungal community assemblages en_UK
dc.subject Soil depth en_UK
dc.subject Ngari drylands en_UK
dc.subject High dispersal en_UK
dc.subject Environmental selection en_UK
dc.subject Null models en_UK
dc.title Fungal community assemblages in a high elevation desert environment: absence of dispersal limitation and edaphic effects in surface soil en_UK
dc.type Article en_UK


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